Radioactive dating uranium

(Do not confuse with the highly radioactive isotope, strontium-90.) Strontium occurs naturally as a mixture of several nuclides, including the stable isotope strontium-86.

If three different strontium-containing minerals form at the same time in the same magma, each strontium containing mineral will have the same ratios of the different strontium nuclides, since all strontium nuclides behave the same chemically.

Therefore the amount of argon formed provides a direct measurement of the amount of potassium-40 present in the specimen when it was originally formed.

However, any escaping argon gas would lead to a determined age younger, not older, than actual.

Strontium-86 is a stable element that does not undergo radioactive change.

In addition, it is not formed as the result of a radioactive decay process.

It has the same number of protons, otherwise it wouldn't be uranium.

The number of protons in the nucleus of an atom is called its atomic number.

Leave a Reply