Dating people different faiths

I hastily accepted an internship with a small advertising agency in Flatiron, the kind of workplace that was so barebones, they hadn’t even bothered to disguise the fact that they’d set up shop in a former doctor’s office. On one of those outings, I let him know I was finally single again. I left the job not long afterward, and decided to move back to New Jersey for a while for a mental regroup.

James and I kept in touch, and soon I was spending weekends at his place in Greenpoint. We were sprawled out on a patch of dusty crabgrass, half-watching a group of hipsters play kickball as we covertly sipped beer from paper bags. “I grew up Catholic,” he said.“But being here in the city has made me see things differently.” It was an honest answer, and it was up to me to decide how much it mattered.

Many of us have accepted that if we want to have a child with a partner -- while our clocks are ticking like the bells of Westminster Abbey -- we may have to compromise instead of waiting around for the elusive Mr. I really thought by now I'd be married to my childhood fantasy (Mr.

Tall Dark Handsome), and my only stress would be dealing with the woes of getting my nearly-perfect children into the right schools.

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The awkwardness was still there when he bent down to give me a stiff parting hug at my train’s turnstile. This sort of thing has become a trend in my dating life: I meet someone who seems funny, smart, and interesting.), but the deeper we went, the more I realized how much value he places on the Christian community from which he sprung, and just how important his faith is to him. Dad is a staunch atheist, mom a wayward Hindu (she eats Big Macs and never prays).There was a short period when I was around eight or nine when I was convinced I would "be doomed to hell" if I did anything bad, like, for example, putting Jell-O in my brother's bed (even if he did deserve it).Our therapist said our conflict wasn’t really about religion; it was rooted in identity.My religion was closely tied to who I was, which meant that James’s avoidance of the subject felt like an outright rejection of me.

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